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Tutorial
Visualization for Machine Learning
Fernanda Viégas · Martin Wattenberg

Mon Dec 03 05:30 AM -- 07:30 AM (PST) @ Room 220 E

Visualization is a powerful way to understand and interpret machine learning--as well as a promising area for ML researchers to investigate. This tutorial will provide an introduction to the landscape of ML visualizations, organized by types of users and their goals. We'll discuss how each stage of the ML research and development pipeline lends itself to different visualization techniques: analyzing training data, understanding the internals of a model, and testing performance. In addition, we’ll explore how visualization can play an important role in ML education and outreach to non-technical stakeholders.

The tutorial will also include a brief introduction to key techniques from the fields of graphic design and human-computer interaction that are relevant in designing data displays. These ideas are helpful whether refining existing visualizations, or inventing entirely new visual techniques.

Author Information

Fernanda Viégas (Google)

Fernanda Viégas co-leads Google’s PAIR (People+AI Research) initiative, part of Google Brain. Her work in machine learning, with long-time collaborator Martin Wattenberg, focuses on improving human/AI interaction with a broader agenda of democratizing AI technology. She is well known for her contributions to social and collaborative visualization, and the systems she and her team have created are used daily by millions of people. Her visualization-based artwork with Wattenberg has been exhibited worldwide, and is part of the permanent collection of Museum of Modern Art in New York. Fernanda holds a PhD from the MIT Media Lab.

Martin Wattenberg (Google)

Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg co-lead Google’s PAIR (People+AI Research) initiative, part of Google Brain. Their work in machine learning focuses on transparency and interpretability, as part of a broad agenda to improve human/AI interaction. They are well known for their contributions to social and collaborative visualization, and the systems they’ve created are used daily by millions of people. Their visualization-based artwork has been exhibited worldwide, and is part of the permanent collection of Museum of Modern Art in New York.

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