Poster
Compositional Plan Vectors
Coline Devin · Daniel Geng · Pieter Abbeel · Trevor Darrell · Sergey Levine

Wed Dec 11th 10:45 AM -- 12:45 PM @ East Exhibition Hall B + C #191

Autonomous agents situated in real-world environments must be able to master large repertoires of skills. While a single short skill can be learned quickly, it would be impractical to learn every task independently. Instead, the agent should share knowledge across behaviors such that each task can be learned efficiently, and such that the resulting model can generalize to new tasks, especially ones that are compositions or subsets of tasks seen previously. A policy conditioned on a goal or demonstration has the potential to share knowledge between tasks if it sees enough diversity of inputs. However, these methods may not generalize to a more complex task at test time. We introduce compositional plan vectors (CPVs) to enable a policy to perform compositions of tasks without additional supervision. CPVs represent trajectories as the sum of the subtasks within them. We show that CPVs can be learned within a one-shot imitation learning framework without any additional supervision or information about task hierarchy, and enable a demonstration-conditioned policy to generalize to tasks that sequence twice as many skills as the tasks seen during training. Analogously to embeddings such as word2vec in NLP, CPVs can also support simple arithmetic operations -- for example, we can add the CPVs for two different tasks to command an agent to compose both tasks, without any additional training.

Author Information

Coline Devin (UC Berkeley)
Daniel Geng (UC Berkeley)
Pieter Abbeel (UC Berkeley & covariant.ai)

Pieter Abbeel is Professor and Director of the Robot Learning Lab at UC Berkeley [2008- ], Co-Director of the Berkeley AI Research (BAIR) Lab, Co-Founder of covariant.ai [2017- ], Co-Founder of Gradescope [2014- ], Advisor to OpenAI, Founding Faculty Partner AI@TheHouse venture fund, Advisor to many AI/Robotics start-ups. He works in machine learning and robotics. In particular his research focuses on making robots learn from people (apprenticeship learning), how to make robots learn through their own trial and error (reinforcement learning), and how to speed up skill acquisition through learning-to-learn (meta-learning). His robots have learned advanced helicopter aerobatics, knot-tying, basic assembly, organizing laundry, locomotion, and vision-based robotic manipulation. He has won numerous awards, including best paper awards at ICML, NIPS and ICRA, early career awards from NSF, Darpa, ONR, AFOSR, Sloan, TR35, IEEE, and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). Pieter's work is frequently featured in the popular press, including New York Times, BBC, Bloomberg, Wall Street Journal, Wired, Forbes, Tech Review, NPR.

Trevor Darrell (UC Berkeley)
Sergey Levine (UC Berkeley)

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