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Workshop
Machine Learning and the Physical Sciences
Anima Anandkumar · Kyle Cranmer · Mr. Prabhat · Lenka Zdeborová · Atilim Gunes Baydin · Juan Carrasquilla · Emine Kucukbenli · Gilles Louppe · Benjamin Nachman · Brian Nord · Savannah Thais

Mon Dec 13 07:00 AM -- 05:00 PM (PST) @ None
Event URL: https://ml4physicalsciences.github.io »

The "Machine Learning and the Physical Sciences" workshop aims to provide a cutting-edge venue for research at the interface of machine learning (ML) and the physical sciences. This interface spans (1) applications of ML in physical sciences (“ML for physics”) and (2) developments in ML motivated by physical insights (“physics for ML”).

ML methods have had great success in learning complex representations of data that enable novel modeling and data processing approaches in many scientific disciplines. Physical sciences span problems and challenges at all scales in the universe: from finding exoplanets in trillions of sky pixels, to finding ML inspired solutions to the quantum many-body problem, to detecting anomalies in event streams from the Large Hadron Collider, to predicting how extreme weather events will vary with climate change. Tackling a number of associated data-intensive tasks including, but not limited to, segmentation, 3D computer vision, sequence modeling, causal reasoning, generative modeling, and efficient probabilistic inference are critical for furthering scientific discovery. In addition to using ML models for scientific discovery, tools and insights from the physical sciences are increasingly brought to the study of ML models.

By bringing together ML researchers and physical scientists who apply and study ML, we expect to strengthen the interdisciplinary dialogue, introduce exciting new open problems to the broader community, and stimulate the production of new approaches to solving challenging open problems in the sciences. Invited talks from leading individuals in both communities will cover the state-of-the-art techniques and set the stage for this workshop, which will also include contributed talks selected from submissions. The workshop will also feature an expert panel discussion on “Physics for ML" and a breakout session dedicated to community building will serve to foster dialogue between physical science and ML research communities.

Mon 7:00 a.m. - 7:10 a.m.
Session 1 | Opening remarks (Live intro)
Mon 7:10 a.m. - 7:35 a.m.
Session 1 | Invited talk: Megan Ansdell (Invited talk)
Mon 7:35 a.m. - 7:45 a.m.
Session 1 | Invited talk Q&A: Megan Ansdell (Live Q&A)
Mon 7:45 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.
Session 1 | Contributed talk 1 (Contributed talk)
Mon 8:00 a.m. - 8:15 a.m.
Session 1 | Contributed talk 2 (Contributed talk)
Mon 8:15 a.m. - 8:40 a.m.
Session 1 | Invited talk: Bingqing Cheng (Invited talk)
Mon 8:40 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.
Session 1 | Invited talk Q&A: Bingqing Cheng (Live Q&A)
Mon 8:50 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.
Session 1 | Poster session (Poster session (Gather.town))
Mon 10:20 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Session 2 | Opening remarks (Live intro)
Mon 10:25 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
Session 2 | Panel discussion: Jennifer Chayes, Marylou Gabrié, Michela Paganini, Sara Solla, Moderator: Lenka Zdeborová (Live panel discussion)
Mon 11:25 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.
Session 2 | Invited talk: Surya Ganguli (Invited talk)
Mon 11:50 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Session 2 | Invited talk Q&A: Surya Ganguli (Live Q&A)
Mon 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Session 2 | Poster session (Poster session (Gather.town))
Mon 1:30 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Session 3 | Opening remarks (Live intro)
Mon 1:35 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Session 3 | Invited talk: Max Welling (Invited talk)
Mon 2:00 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.
Session 3 | Invited talk Q&A: Max Welling (Live Q&A)
Mon 2:10 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Session 3 | Invited talk: Laure Zanna (Invited talk)
Mon 2:35 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Session 3 | Invited talk Q&A: Laure Zanna (Live Q&A)
Mon 2:45 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Session 3 | Contributed talk 3 (Contributed talk)
Mon 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Session 3 | Community development breakouts (Community breakout session (Gather.town))
Mon 4:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Session 3 | Feedback from community development breakouts (Live feedback)

Author Information

Anima Anandkumar (NVIDIA / Caltech)

Anima Anandkumar is a Bren professor at Caltech CMS department and a director of machine learning research at NVIDIA. Her research spans both theoretical and practical aspects of large-scale machine learning. In particular, she has spearheaded research in tensor-algebraic methods, non-convex optimization, probabilistic models and deep learning. Anima is the recipient of several awards and honors such as the Bren named chair professorship at Caltech, Alfred. P. Sloan Fellowship, Young investigator awards from the Air Force and Army research offices, Faculty fellowships from Microsoft, Google and Adobe, and several best paper awards. Anima received her B.Tech in Electrical Engineering from IIT Madras in 2004 and her PhD from Cornell University in 2009. She was a postdoctoral researcher at MIT from 2009 to 2010, a visiting researcher at Microsoft Research New England in 2012 and 2014, an assistant professor at U.C. Irvine between 2010 and 2016, an associate professor at U.C. Irvine between 2016 and 2017 and a principal scientist at Amazon Web Services between 2016 and 2018.

Kyle Cranmer (New York University)

Kyle Cranmer is an Associate Professor of Physics at New York University and affiliated with NYU's Center for Data Science. He is an experimental particle physicists working, primarily, on the Large Hadron Collider, based in Geneva, Switzerland. He was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering in 2007 and the National Science Foundation's Career Award in 2009. Professor Cranmer developed a framework that enables collaborative statistical modeling, which was used extensively for the discovery of the Higgs boson in July, 2012. His current interests are at the intersection of physics and machine learning and include inference in the context of intractable likelihoods, development of machine learning models imbued with physics knowledge, adversarial training for robustness to systematic uncertainty, the use of generative models in the physical sciences, and integration of reproducible workflows in the inference pipeline.

Mr. Prabhat (LBL/NERSC)
Lenka Zdeborová (CEA)
Atilim Gunes Baydin (University of Oxford)
Juan Carrasquilla (Vector Institute)

Juan Carrasquilla is a full-time researcher at the Vector Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Toronto, Canada, where he works on the intersection of condensed matter physics, quantum computing, and machine learning - such as combining quantum Monte Carlo simulations and machine learning techniques to analyze the collective behaviour of quantum many-body systems. He completed his PhD in Physics at the International School for Advanced Studies in Italy and has since held positions as a Postdoctoral Fellow at Georgetown University and the Perimeter Institute, as a Visiting Research Scholar at Penn State University, and was a Research Scientist at D-Wave Systems Inc. in Burnaby, British Columbia.

Emine Kucukbenli (Boston University)
Gilles Louppe (University of Liège)
Benjamin Nachman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
Brian Nord (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory)
Savannah Thais (Princeton University)

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