`

Timezone: »

 
Poster
How Powerful are Performance Predictors in Neural Architecture Search?
Colin White · Arber Zela · Robin Ru · Yang Liu · Frank Hutter

Fri Dec 10 08:30 AM -- 10:00 AM (PST) @ Virtual #None

Early methods in the rapidly developing field of neural architecture search (NAS) required fully training thousands of neural networks. To reduce this extreme computational cost, dozens of techniques have since been proposed to predict the final performance of neural architectures. Despite the success of such performance prediction methods, it is not well-understood how different families of techniques compare to one another, due to the lack of an agreed-upon evaluation metric and optimization for different constraints on the initialization time and query time. In this work, we give the first large-scale study of performance predictors by analyzing 31 techniques ranging from learning curve extrapolation, to weight-sharing, to supervised learning, to zero-cost proxies. We test a number of correlation- and rank-based performance measures in a variety of settings, as well as the ability of each technique to speed up predictor-based NAS frameworks. Our results act as recommendations for the best predictors to use in different settings, and we show that certain families of predictors can be combined to achieve even better predictive power, opening up promising research directions. We release our code, featuring a library of 31 performance predictors.

Author Information

Colin White (Abacus.AI)
Arber Zela (University of Freiburg)
Robin Ru (Oxford University)
Yang Liu (Argo AI)
Frank Hutter (University of Freiburg & Bosch)

Frank Hutter is a Full Professor for Machine Learning at the Computer Science Department of the University of Freiburg (Germany), where he previously was an assistant professor 2013-2017. Before that, he was at the University of British Columbia (UBC) for eight years, for his PhD and postdoc. Frank's main research interests lie in machine learning, artificial intelligence and automated algorithm design. For his 2009 PhD thesis on algorithm configuration, he received the CAIAC doctoral dissertation award for the best thesis in AI in Canada that year, and with his coauthors, he received several best paper awards and prizes in international competitions on machine learning, SAT solving, and AI planning. Since 2016 he holds an ERC Starting Grant for a project on automating deep learning based on Bayesian optimization, Bayesian neural networks, and deep reinforcement learning.

More from the Same Authors