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GAM Changer: Editing Generalized Additive Models with Interactive Visualization
Zijie Jay Wang · Harsha Nori · Duen Horng Chau · Jennifer Wortman Vaughan · Rich Caruana

Recent strides in interpretable machine learning (ML) research reveal that models exploit undesirable patterns in the data to make predictions, which potentially causes harms in deployment. However, it is unclear how we can fix these models. We present our ongoing work, GAM Changer, an open-source interactive system to help data scientists and domain experts easily and responsibly edit their Generalized Additive Models (GAMs). With novel visualization techniques, our tool puts interpretability into action—empowering human users to analyze, validate, and align model behaviors with their knowledge and values. Built using modern web technologies, this tool runs locally in users’ computational notebooks or web browsers without requiring extra compute resources, lowering the barrier to creating more responsible ML models. GAM Changer is available at https://r2c-submission.surge.sh.

Author Information

Zijie Jay Wang (Georgia Tech)

Machine Learning PhD student at Georgia Tech, researching the intersection between information visualization and human-centered machine learning.

Harsha Nori (Microsoft)
Duen Horng Chau (Georgia Tech)
Jennifer Wortman Vaughan (Microsoft Research)
Jennifer Wortman Vaughan

Jenn Wortman Vaughan is a Senior Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, New York City. Her research background is in machine learning and algorithmic economics. She is especially interested in the interaction between people and AI, and has often studied this interaction in the context of prediction markets and other crowdsourcing systems. In recent years, she has turned her attention to human-centered approaches to transparency, interpretability, and fairness in machine learning as part of MSR's FATE group and co-chair of Microsoft’s Aether Working Group on Transparency. Jenn came to MSR in 2012 from UCLA, where she was an assistant professor in the computer science department. She completed her Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 2009, and subsequently spent a year as a Computing Innovation Fellow at Harvard. She is the recipient of Penn's 2009 Rubinoff dissertation award for innovative applications of computer technology, a National Science Foundation CAREER award, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), and a handful of best paper awards. In her "spare" time, Jenn is involved in a variety of efforts to provide support for women in computer science; most notably, she co-founded the Annual Workshop for Women in Machine Learning, which has been held each year since 2006.

Rich Caruana (Microsoft)

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