Session

Oral Session 2: Deep Learning

Moderator: Jun Zhu



Tue 7 Dec 1 a.m. PST — 2 a.m. PST

Abstract:

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Tue 7 Dec. 1:00 - 1:15 PST

(Oral)
Attention over Learned Object Embeddings Enables Complex Visual Reasoning

David Ding · Felix Hill · Adam Santoro · Malcolm Reynolds · Matt Botvinick

Neural networks have achieved success in a wide array of perceptual tasks but often fail at tasks involving both perception and higher-level reasoning. On these more challenging tasks, bespoke approaches (such as modular symbolic components, independent dynamics models or semantic parsers) targeted towards that specific type of task have typically performed better. The downside to these targeted approaches, however, is that they can be more brittle than general-purpose neural networks, requiring significant modification or even redesign according to the particular task at hand. Here, we propose a more general neural-network-based approach to dynamic visual reasoning problems that obtains state-of-the-art performance on three different domains, in each case outperforming bespoke modular approaches tailored specifically to the task. Our method relies on learned object-centric representations, self-attention and self-supervised dynamics learning, and all three elements together are required for strong performance to emerge. The success of this combination suggests that there may be no need to trade off flexibility for performance on problems involving spatio-temporal or causal-style reasoning. With the right soft biases and learning objectives in a neural network we may be able to attain the best of both worlds.

Tue 7 Dec. 1:15 - 1:20 PST

(Q&A)
Q&A

Tue 7 Dec. 1:20 - 1:35 PST

(Oral)
Learning Frequency Domain Approximation for Binary Neural Networks

Yixing Xu · Kai Han · Chang Xu · Yehui Tang · Chunjing XU · Yunhe Wang

Binary neural networks (BNNs) represent original full-precision weights and activations into 1-bit with sign function. Since the gradient of the conventional sign function is almost zero everywhere which cannot be used for back-propagation, several attempts have been proposed to alleviate the optimization difficulty by using approximate gradient. However, those approximations corrupt the main direction of factual gradient. To this end, we propose to estimate the gradient of sign function in the Fourier frequency domain using the combination of sine functions for training BNNs, namely frequency domain approximation (FDA). The proposed approach does not affect the low-frequency information of the original sign function which occupies most of the overall energy, and high-frequency coefficients will be ignored to avoid the huge computational overhead. In addition, we embed a noise adaptation module into the training phase to compensate the approximation error. The experiments on several benchmark datasets and neural architectures illustrate that the binary network learned using our method achieves the state-of-the-art accuracy. Code will be available at https://gitee.com/mindspore/models/tree/master/research/cv/FDA-BNN.

Tue 7 Dec. 1:35 - 1:40 PST

(Q&A)
Q&A

Tue 7 Dec. 1:40 - 1:55 PST

(Oral)
Learning Debiased Representation via Disentangled Feature Augmentation

Jungsoo Lee · Eungyeup Kim · Juyoung Lee · Jihyeon Lee · Jaegul Choo

Image classification models tend to make decisions based on peripheral attributes of data items that have strong correlation with a target variable (i.e., dataset bias). These biased models suffer from the poor generalization capability when evaluated on unbiased datasets. Existing approaches for debiasing often identify and emphasize those samples with no such correlation (i.e., bias-conflicting) without defining the bias type in advance. However, such bias-conflicting samples are significantly scarce in biased datasets, limiting the debiasing capability of these approaches. This paper first presents an empirical analysis revealing that training with "diverse" bias-conflicting samples beyond a given training set is crucial for debiasing as well as the generalization capability. Based on this observation, we propose a novel feature-level data augmentation technique in order to synthesize diverse bias-conflicting samples. To this end, our method learns the disentangled representation of (1) the intrinsic attributes (i.e., those inherently defining a certain class) and (2) bias attributes (i.e., peripheral attributes causing the bias), from a large number of bias-aligned samples, the bias attributes of which have strong correlation with the target variable. Using the disentangled representation, we synthesize bias-conflicting samples that contain the diverse intrinsic attributes of bias-aligned samples by swapping their latent features. By utilizing these diversified bias-conflicting features during the training, our approach achieves superior classification accuracy and debiasing results against the existing baselines on both synthetic and real-world datasets.

Tue 7 Dec. 1:55 - 2:00 PST

(Q&A)
Q&A