Session

Oral Session 3: Vision Applications

Moderator: Phillip Isola



Wed 8 Dec 8 a.m. PST — 9 a.m. PST

Abstract:

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Wed 8 Dec. 8:00 - 8:15 PST

(Oral)
Partial success in closing the gap between human and machine vision

Robert Geirhos · Kantharaju Narayanappa · Benjamin Mitzkus · Tizian Thieringer · Matthias Bethge · Felix A. Wichmann · Wieland Brendel

A few years ago, the first CNN surpassed human performance on ImageNet. However, it soon became clear that machines lack robustness on more challenging test cases, a major obstacle towards deploying machines "in the wild" and towards obtaining better computational models of human visual perception. Here we ask: Are we making progress in closing the gap between human and machine vision? To answer this question, we tested human observers on a broad range of out-of-distribution (OOD) datasets, recording 85,120 psychophysical trials across 90 participants. We then investigated a range of promising machine learning developments that crucially deviate from standard supervised CNNs along three axes: objective function (self-supervised, adversarially trained, CLIP language-image training), architecture (e.g. vision transformers), and dataset size (ranging from 1M to 1B).Our findings are threefold. (1.) The longstanding distortion robustness gap between humans and CNNs is closing, with the best models now exceeding human feedforward performance on most of the investigated OOD datasets. (2.) There is still a substantial image-level consistency gap, meaning that humans make different errors than models. In contrast, most models systematically agree in their categorisation errors, even substantially different ones like contrastive self-supervised vs. standard supervised models. (3.) In many cases, human-to-model consistency improves when training dataset size is increased by one to three orders of magnitude. Our results give reason for cautious optimism: While there is still much room for improvement, the behavioural difference between human and machine vision is narrowing. In order to measure future progress, 17 OOD datasets with image-level human behavioural data and evaluation code are provided as a toolbox and benchmark at: https://github.com/bethgelab/model-vs-human/

Wed 8 Dec. 8:15 - 8:20 PST

(Q&A)
Q&A

Wed 8 Dec. 8:20 - 8:35 PST

(Oral)
Keeping Your Eye on the Ball: Trajectory Attention in Video Transformers

Mandela Patrick · Dylan Campbell · Yuki Asano · Ishan Misra · Florian Metze · Christoph Feichtenhofer · Andrea Vedaldi · João Henriques

In video transformers, the time dimension is often treated in the same way as the two spatial dimensions. However, in a scene where objects or the camera may move, a physical point imaged at one location in frame $t$ may be entirely unrelated to what is found at that location in frame $t+k$. These temporal correspondences should be modeled to facilitate learning about dynamic scenes. To this end, we propose a new drop-in block for video transformers - trajectory attention - that aggregates information along implicitly determined motion paths. We additionally propose a new method to address the quadratic dependence of computation and memory on the input size, which is particularly important for high resolution or long videos. While these ideas are useful in a range of settings, we apply them to the specific task of video action recognition with a transformer model and obtain state-of-the-art results on the Kinetics, Something-Something V2, and Epic-Kitchens datasets.

Wed 8 Dec. 8:35 - 8:40 PST

(Q&A)
Q&A

Wed 8 Dec. 8:40 - 8:55 PST

(Oral)
Volume Rendering of Neural Implicit Surfaces

Lior Yariv · Jiatao Gu · Yoni Kasten · Yaron Lipman

Neural volume rendering became increasingly popular recently due to its success in synthesizing novel views of a scene from a sparse set of input images. So far, the geometry learned by neural volume rendering techniques was modeled using a generic density function. Furthermore, the geometry itself was extracted using an arbitrary level set of the density function leading to a noisy, often low fidelity reconstruction.The goal of this paper is to improve geometry representation and reconstruction in neural volume rendering. We achieve that by modeling the volume density as a function of the geometry. This is in contrast to previous work modeling the geometry as a function of the volume density. In more detail, we define the volume density function as Laplace's cumulative distribution function (CDF) applied to a signed distance function (SDF) representation. This simple density representation has three benefits: (i) it provides a useful inductive bias to the geometry learned in the neural volume rendering process; (ii) it facilitates a bound on the opacity approximation error, leading to an accurate sampling of the viewing ray. Accurate sampling is important to provide a precise coupling of geometry and radiance; and (iii) it allows efficient unsupervised disentanglement of shape and appearance in volume rendering.Applying this new density representation to challenging scene multiview datasets produced high quality geometry reconstructions, outperforming relevant baselines. Furthermore, switching shape and appearance between scenes is possible due to the disentanglement of the two.

Wed 8 Dec. 8:55 - 9:00 PST

(Q&A)
Q&A